2021

Ongoing: We are excited to announce our newly expanded online research. Since last year, we have been working to move our studies with children online to make them more accessible to families who want to participate. Families can now find our studies through Children Helping Science and through our own Online Research website.

October: Anna Papafragou will present a talk on acquiring spatial language and spatial concepts at the PINA colloquium in Potsdam.

July: Our lab has a talk and two posters at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. Martin Ip will give his talk "Listeners evaluate native and non-native speakers differently (but not in the way you think,)" (Ip, M. & Papafragou, A.). Dionysia Saratsli will present her poster "Pragmatic bias and the learnability of semantic distinctions" (Saratsli, D. & Papafragou, A.) and Andrea Beltrama will present his poster "We are what we say: Pragmatic violations have social costs" (Beltrama, A. & Papafragou, A.).

July: Anna Papafragou will lead a session on "Language and Event Representation" at the CEU Summer School in Object and Event Cognition in Budapest.

June: Anna Papafragou presented a talk on Informativeness in language production and acquisition at the Distinguished Speakers in Language Science Colloquium Series at Saarland University.

June: Lab alumna Myrto Grigoroglou presented her work with Anna Papafragou titled "Speaker adjustments to addressees during language production" at the virtual Conference on Mutual Knowledge (MK40).

May: Lab alumna Yue Ji presented her work with Anna Papafragou titled "Children are sensitive to the internal profile of events" at the 12th Dubrovnik Conference on Cognitive Science.

May: Anna Papafragou has been awarded a new NSF grant on "Event structure in language and cognition". This project addresses key questions about the nature of events: How do we represent events in thought? How do novice (child) and experienced (adult) communicators use language to encode event representations? Do speakers of different languages think about events in the world differently? This deeply interdisciplinary research offers unique training opportunities in the cognitive sciences at the postdoctoral, graduate, and undergraduate level, and includes international collaborations. Please get in touch if you would like to get involved!

April: Anna Papafragou will join the team of Associate Editors in Language Learning and Development. The journal is the official publication of the Society for Language Development. 

March: Anna Papafragou gave a Linguistics Colloquium on event structure in language and cognition at the University of Southern California. 

March: Anna Papafragou gave a Linguistics Colloquium on event representation in the Department of Linguistic at University College London. 

March: Anna Papafragou delivered the Harold Schlosberg Colloquium in the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University. Her talk addressed relations between cognition and language.

March: Our lab had two posters at the virtual 34th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing! Martin Ip presented his poster "The social benefits of being a non-native speaker," (Ip, M. & Papafragou, A.), and Andrea Beltrama presented his poster "The social cost of maxims violations: Pragmatic behavior informs speaker evaluation," (Beltrama, A. & Papafragou, A.).

March: Anna Papafragou joined a number of University of Pennsylvania faculty members in co-organizing the 34th Annual CUNY Conference on Human Sentence Processing! This year's virtual conference took place March 4-6. 

January: Anna Papafragou had a fun virtual visit with the University of Chicago's Department of Linguistics! Anna gave her talk. "Event representations in language and cognition," as part of the department's Colloquium series.

January: This year, our lab had a strong presence at the 95th Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America! Dionysia Saratsli gave her talk, "The role of social cognition in word learning: Meaning retention and pragmatic inferences" (Saratsli, D., Papafragou, A., & Qi, Z.) and Andrea Beltrama gave his talk, "The social cost of violating maxims: How pragmatic reasoning informs speaker evaluation" (Beltrama, A. & Papafragou, A.). Dionysia also presented her poster, "Pragmatic effects on the acquisition of novel evidentials" (Saratsli, D. & Papafragou, A.) and Martin Ip presented his poster, "Socio-pragmatic meaning from non-native speech signals" (Ip, M. & Papafragou, A.).

2020

December: Our lab has recently joined Children Helping Science, an online hub where families can find and take part in research studies hosted by universities around the world. We are grateful for this amazing initiative to connect researchers with families and to make taking part in research a more accessible experience! 

November: Our lab presented a talk and a poster at the 45th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development. Our talk was titled "Pragmatic effects on the learnability of evidentiality systems" (Saratsli, D. & A. Papafragou), and our poster was  on "Social cognition and pragmatic inference in word learning" (Qi, Z., D. Saratsli, & A. Papafragou).

October: Anna Papafragou became the new Director of Penn's Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Language and Communication Sciences!

September: Our lab presented 1 talk and 3 posters at the conference on Experiments in Linguistic Meaning hosted by the University of Pennsylvania. Our talk was titled "Unable or unwilling? Being under-informative is interpreted differently for native and non-native speakers" (Fairchild, S., A. Mathis, & A. Papafragou). We also presented "Agents' goals affect placement of event endpoints" (Mathis, A. & A. Papafragou), "The role of executive function and theory of mind in pragmatic computations" (Fairchild, S. & A. Papafragou), and "Expressing the unseen: Learning to encode inference as an information source" (Saratsli, D. & A. Papafragou) as posters.

September: Anna Papafragou and Florian Schwarz co-organized the first Experiments in Linguistic Meaning (ELM) conference that was hosted virtually by the University of Pennsylvania, September 16-18, 2020. The conference was dedicated to the experimental study of linguistic meaning broadly construed, with a focus on theoretical issues in semantics and pragmatics, their interplay with other components of the grammar, their relation to language processing and acquisition, as well as their connections to human cognition and computation. ELM aims to include representation of linguistic, psychological, logical, philosophical, social, developmental, computational, as well as cross-linguistic and cross-cultural perspectives. The ELM schedule can be found here. Proceedings from ELM will be available from the Linguistic Society of America as an open-access publication.  

August: Postdoc Andrea Beltrama discussed the "Pandemic lexicon" in an interview for Penn Today.

July: Lab member Ariel Mathis gave a talk titled, "Intentionality Effects on Event Boundaries" at the 42nd Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society. 

May: Yue Ji successfully defended her dissertation, titled "The Internal Temporal Structure of Events in Language and Cognition". She will go on to a tenure-track position as Assistant Professor at the Beijing Institute of Technology, School of Foreign Languages. Congratulations, Yue!

May: Undergraduate student Ebony Goldman received a Spring 2020 MindCORE Grant for Undergraduate Online Research studies.

May: Undergraduate student Ebony Gold was accepted to the Lila R. Gleitman Undergraduate Summer Fellowship Program in Interdisciplinary Mind and Brain Studies.

April: Anna Papafragou was scheduled to give a talk during the Harold Schlosberg Colloquium in the Department of Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences at Brown University. The Colloquium was rescheduled

March: Our lab presented 1 talk and 3 posters at at the 33rd Annual CUNY Human Sentence Processing conference held virtually. Our talk was titled "The role of executive function and theory of mind in pragmatic computations" (Fairchild, S., & A. Papafragou). We also presented "Pragmatics and event structure: A closer look at their interaction in language production" (Do, M., A. Papafragou, & J. Trueswell), "Agents’ goals affect placement of event endpoints" (Mathis, A., & A. Papafragou), and "Unable or unwilling? Being under-informative is interpreted differently for native and non-native speakers" (Fairchild, S., A. Mathis, & A. Papafragou).

February: Graduate student Dionysia Saratsli was awarded a Graduate Grant 2019 by Gorilla -  an online experimental platform specifically geared for the behavioral sciences (www.gorilla.sc). The grant will support a study that is running in collaboration with Dr. Zhenghan Qi from the The Language Acquisition and Brain Lab at the University of Delaware (https://sites.udel.edu/q-lab/). The study explores the role of social cognition in word learning. Dionysia is one of only 26 winners worldwide (https://gorilla.sc/grants/winners2019). 

January: Graduate student Alyssa Kampa was selected as a finalist to compete in the Five-minute Linguist Competition, which was held as a plenary event at the Linguistic Society of America's 2020 Annual Meeting. 

January: Graduate students Yue Ji and Alyssa Kampa presented their work at the Linguistic Society of America 2020 Annual Meeting. 

January: Anna Papafragou was elected a Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (APS). Fellow status is awarded to APS members “who have made sustained outstanding contributions to the science of psychology”.

2019

December: Anna Papafragou gave a talk during the Workshop on motion verbs at the University of Athens in Greece.

December: Graduate student Dionysia Saratsli was awarded the Gerondelis Foundation Scholarship.

November: Graduate students Yue Ji and Alyssa Kampa was presented their work at the 44th Annual Boston University Conference on Language Development.  Alyssa has received a Paula Menyuk Travel Award to attend.

September: Anna Papafragou gave a talk during the Workshop on Endless Possibilities: The Development of Possibility and Necessity in Cognition, Language, and Society at the University of Maryland.

September: Anna Papafragou gave a talk at the Cognitive Science Colloquium at the University of Maryland.

July: Graduate students Yue Ji, Alyssa Kampa, Catherine Richards, and Dionysia Saratsli presented their work at the 41st Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society in Montreal. 

July: Anna Papafragou joined University of Pennsylvania's Department of Linguistics.

June: Graduate student, Dionysia Saratsli completed a Linguist Internship at Google LLC during the summer.

May: Anna Papafragou led a 3-lecture workshop at Queen Mary University of London.

May: Anna Papafragou gave a talk at the Department of Linguistics at Queen Mary University of London.

May: Anna Papafragou gave a talk at the 12th Annual Meeting of Concepts, Actions, and Objects: Functional and Neural Perspectives in Rovereto, Italy.

April: Anna Papafragou gave a talk at the Integrated Science and Technology Seminar at the University of Pennsylvania.

April: Graduate students Yue Ji, Alyssa Kampa and Dionysia Saratsli presented their work at the 8th meeting of the Mid-Atlantic Colloquium of Studies in Meaning. 

March: Graduate students Alyssa Kampa and Dionysia Saratsli presented their work at the 2019 Biennial Meeting for the Society for Research in Child Development in Baltimore, MD.  Alyssa received an SRCD Graduate Student Travel Award to attend.